Hohner Morino VI N Photos

April 2, 2016

The story starts with one man… Venazio Morino, which kind of explains why my accordion is called a Morino.

That’s a picture of the man above.  Born December 11th, 1876, there is not much info out there on his life, but it is known that he became Hohner’s chief designing engineer and started making instruments according to his own vision in 1936.  His vision evenyually became Hohner’s vision.  I found an online article that was apparently written just after Morino had turned 80 years old:

(Translated Article from 1956, on the occasion of Herr Morino’s 80th Birthday)
A man, his coat collar turned up, a pipe in his mouth and minding his own business, briskly striding along in the company of his dog which answers which answers to German, French and Italian commands. This Trossingen citizen who lives wholly for his craft is called Venanzio Morino, Germany’s most significant accordion builder of his time, and designer of the Hohner Morino accordion which is often claimed to be the best in the world.
 
Today we are able to extend to Herr Morino our best wishes on his 80th birthday and good health and happiness for the future. Nor will we forget that the 80-year-old still goes to work every day to be with his friend and excellent successor, Giovanni Gola, in order to plan, construct and achieve.
 
The secret behind such enduring love of work coupled with astounding vitality may be due to Herr Morino’s healthy outlook on life. Asked about his political views he answered “I am neither a Nationalist nor a Fascist but an Accordionist”. His hobbies are travel, with trips to Italy, Switzerland, French, Denmark and Belgium, the study of technical literature and also the more relaxing reading of mostly Italian newspapers and good books. His family and work mean everything to him. Blessed with a healthy and regular sleep pattern helping him to restore body and mind throughout a busy lifetime Herr Morino hardly noticed the quickly passing years. Only in his quieter moments may he occasionally have realised that he had reached the Biblical age of 80.
 
Our birthday-boy can look back on a lifetime of hard work. When only a young boy he had to go to work with his father, helping to feed a big family. Born on the 11th December, 1876 in the northern Italian village of Burnasco, we can see him daily walking to work in Turin to earn money.
 
It was a hard but instructive youth. It made him more aware and stimulated his inborn sense for invention. His foremost talent was for tinkering with things, so he had to become a joiner. The fragrant wood one could plane and shave was a welcome material for his talented hands. The hidden longing for music and the dream of a musical instrument suitable for the general public and it’s aspirations led Herr Morino, the apprentice joiner to construct his first melodeon. It was a difficult beginning but there was a sense of destiny. When Morino moved from Italy to Geneva he met an accordion builder from whom he gained more useful knowledge. About 1900 he set up on his own.
 
When, shortly after the turn of the century, management of the Hohner company decided to include production of melodeons and accordions, it was clear from the beginning that with the increase in production it would also be desirable to improve artistic quality to its utmost. Was it accident or fate that shortly after the First Would War Swiss friends of director DR. Earnest Hohner, mentioned Morino to him.
 
After the two men’s meeting, Morino decided to come to Trossingen. That was the planner and master of accordion building was able to take advantage of all the opportunities a worldwide company could offer him. Intuition and working expertise merged with ambitious plans of the Hohner company. Always encouraged by his friends Ernst Hohner and Elias Messner, in constant touch with old master Schittenhelm and numerous requests by accordionists led Morino to develop the Hohner Morino accordion which was to become a sign of world wide quality.
 
Despite these creative successes he remained unassuming, a humble man spending his life in the midst of his family, constantly working and planning. A widower for 10 years he married Fran Hella – nee Gottling – in 1932. She gave the man, who loved home and family life, a new home. His son Raymond and daughter Germaine, both from his first marriage, live in Geneva. Raymond manages an accordion school, Germaine is married.
 
His second son Guido is an electrical engineer, having inherited his father’s technical talent. That is the family circle of this considerate and caring man who built and gave the world so many excellent accordions without ever expecting any thanks in return.
 
Working, to make life worthwhile – cultivating the arts to gather new strength, helping and guiding the next generation – caring beyond one’s own self. These are the marked characteristics of our birthday child for whom are the following words “Only what we have loved have we understood”.

Venazio passed away on February 1st, 1961.

 

Here are a few photos of my very highly favored accordion, a Hohner Morino VI N Free Bass accordion.

Below we have a sliding gallery window with 63 photos in the gallery.  Clicking on the left or right side of the picture moves the gallery forward or backward one picture at a time, or backwards in larger numbers by clicking on the dots underneath the window.  One can also go full frame and see larger versions of all photos by clicking on the dual arrows that face away from each other symbol in the upper-right part of the frame.  To return back to a small size, click the ESC (or Escape) button.  of course, one can click on the dual arrows that face each other to return to the standard page.

 

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Now, here below, clicking on any picture opens it in a new tab.  To return to this page, you can click on the red “X” to close the new tab or just click on the tab that contains this page in your browser.

A shot inside of the bass reeds…
this is one busy and very filled accordion!

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A shot inside of the treble reeds…
talk about being filled to the brim!

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A totally beautiful instrument, and in a small way, almost a work of art.  These are no longer even made anymore in this configuration for many years.

I want to leave you with a chuckle, so here is a trait that this accordion has that no other accordion I have owned, played or seen up close has… each and every time I put on this accordion, as I strap it on, if you have the chance, watch me… I consciously or not ALWAYS place my head closer to it and take in a deep breath because the smell of this accordion is so unique and special to me, and every time I smell this scent, it sends me back to a time in my life long past.  This accordion smells like no other!



 

5:32 PM 4/10/2016